Hiroshima: Memoirs of a Survivor

In the early morning of August 6th, 1945, an eight year old girl played in the schoolyard with her classmates. Suddenly there was a flash of light followed by a tremendous blast. In an instant her life had changed forever. This is her story of survival and renewal.

Jane Nimi receives Honorary Lifetime Membership

[Nikkei Seniors Update] This recognition is belated as you can imagine, any person who receives a lifetime membership has been serving the organizations for many years. Jane, is a good friend to us all here at Nikkei Place, and we have appreciated her support through the years to the seniors and to the cultural community.

Dr. Akira Horii: Presidents’ Award Recipient

Akira Horii’s parents had lived in BC since their arrival in the 1920s from Mirozu, a small fishing village in the Wakayama area of Japan. His father helped to build a thriving cod fishery and establish the first multi-ethnic fishing association, the BC Cod Fishermen’s Coop. The Horii family lived in Japantown, an area around Powell Street in Vancouver.

Takeo Yamashiro: Outstanding Community Service Award Recipient

Takeo Yamashiro was born in July of 1943 and is a registered survivor of the atomic bombing on August 6, 1945. He began playing the shakuhachi in Kyoto, while in University. He was the last uchi deshi (live-in disciple) of master Kikusui Koku at the Shakado Temple, Kyoto where he received his shihan certificate and shakuhachi name “RENPU,” Lotus Wind.

Yoko Matsuno: Japanese Culture Award Recipient

Yoko Matsuno started taking lessons when she was 4 years old. She liked dancing so much that she decided to proceed with the intensive study to master the art form through the Nishikawa school of odori. In 1962, she received the her Natori (teaching name), Kayo Nishikawa. Mrs. Matsuno not only dances but also plays shamisen, a three-stringed instrument used for accompanying odori. In 1973 she became a certified shamisen player specializing in Nagauta (“long song”), and took another stage name Katsuyuya Kineya. In the same year she immigrated to Canada.

John Endo Greenaway: Japanese Canadian History Preservation & Education Award Recipient

John Endo Greenaway lived in the downtown east side for over 30 years (His parents co-founded Strathcona’s first housing co-op at Union St. and were involved in the 1970’s fight to stop the freeway). Now based in Port Moody, BC, in an interview he stated that “When my family moved to Vancouver when I was 10 we ended up in Strathcona in what may have been Vancouver’s first housing co-op on Union Street. That was where my mother — a second generation Japanese-Canadian — started to reconnect with her roots, which she had really lost contact with, and also how I became involved in helping to form Canada’s first Taiko group Katari Taiko, work on the Powell Street Festival and more. Amazingly, the Strathcona Community Centre used to let us use its space to practise three times a week for a number of years until they realized that nobody else could do anything else when we rehearsing because of the volume. ”

Our First Monthly Giving Mingle!

On Saturday, April 11th, we held our first ever Nikkei Place Foundation Monthly Giving Club Appreciation Mingle! It was an exciting chance for us to reunite with some familiar faces in the community as well as happily welcome new faces to Nikkei Place. Monthly Giving is a different form of giving back to the community and is suitable for any age — thank you all for the support and heart for Nikkei Place!

Octopus’ Garden:

Creating a Disneyland-like Restaurant for All Ages and Nationalities

Reviewed By Junko Mayede, Nikkei Life Editor This month I am reviewing Octopus’ Garden, a restaurant celebrating its 23rd anniversary this September. On the day I visited with my co-worker, I noticed that despite the restaurant being packed to the gills, owner and chef Sada-san always seemed to be having a great time chatting with the […]